NavyJack – Chicago Police Warn of Nationwide Protests Over Paul O’Neil Shooting (Updated 08/09/2016)

NavyJack – Chicago Police Warn of Nationwide Protests Over Paul O’Neil Shooting (Updated 08/09/2016)

Multiple videos were released on Friday showing the Chicago Police shooting of Paul O’Neil, an unarmed teen.    Officers can be seen firing at the teen in a stolen Jaguar. They are shown chasing, apprehending and then pushing his head down to the sidewalk after he’d been shot.

“What I saw was a cold-blooded murder. It was a cold-blooded killing. You don’t even shoot — you shouldn’t even shoot dogs that are running away” said Michael Oppenheimer, the attorney for O’Neal’s family.

The 18-year-old was shot and killed by police during a stolen vehicle investigation in Chicago’s South Shore neighborhood.

The videos released include a dash-cam from the squad car with two officers involved in the shooting, as well as body camera videos from the officers in that car. Several of the videos show officers firing.  The videos show the Jaguar O’Neil was driving hitting a police SUV, and O’Neal running as police pursued him behind some homes, running up driveways and jumping fences. There does not appear to be any video showing shots being fired after O’Neal is seen running away from the car. Representatives of O’Neal’s family say that’s when he was shot in the back. Shots can be heard on body camera footage during the chase, and one officer can be heard asking who was firing.  The videos capture at least 15 shots being fired as the Jaguar passed the officers and drove away.  The sound of four more shots can be heard during the foot pursuit.

See additional videos and commentary at DNA Info Chicago.

The Chicago Police Department has issued an alert to warn law enforcement departments around the country that the release of today’s of body camera video showing the fatal shooting of a black man by three officers may cause violence against police in their own communities.

“Law enforcement authorities in Chicago warned that making the video of Paul O’Neal’s death public, along with the anniversary of Michael Brown’s death on Aug. 9 in Ferguson, Missouri, may cause an uptick in violence against police nationwide.”

Three Chicago police officers have been relieved of duty after a preliminary determination that they had violated police department policy, according to Fox News.

Police nationwide have been on high alert since a sniper killed five officers during a Black Lives Matter protest on July 7 and another three officers were gunned down in Baton Rouge, Louisiana only 10 days later. The Chicago Tribune has complete coverage of this evolving story.

Update 08/09/2016

According to Fox News, one Chicago gang has claimed to have a sniper in place and said that it has distributed illegal automatic weapons to other gangs. Local authorities are on high alert, and officers have been asked to “limit their interactions” as well as their visibility.

 

 

About Author

Navy Jack

I enlisted in the USN in 1977 and was honorably discharged in 1986. During my service I deployed on various platforms, including submarines, amphibious assault units and special boats. I participated in expeditionary and humanitarian missions to the North Atlantic, Iran, Beirut, Libya, and the Caribbean. After leaving the U.S. Navy I went to work for a large DoD contractor. I became President of that company in 1993. In 2002, I founded an Internet service company and I am currently the CEO of that company. I am a Patron Life Member of the NRA. I am an Oath Keeper Life Member. I have worked diligently to defend the Bill of Rights and have testified many times before various Federal and State legislative committees.

Comments

  1. Greg K 6 August, 2016, 17:49

    The 3rd most disturbing thing about this is that “they were acting according to Policy.” What does the Law say about this? I know what my Constitution says.

    The 2nd most disturbing thing about this is, once again we see lazy, scared folk with guns serving in a protective force situation. How many more times are we going to find out the police showed up on a tip, or SWAT showed up at the wrong address and shot a home owner, before we awaken to the real problem, which is the 1st most disturbing.

    It’s the Politicians, not the cops that are the disease. The bad cops, not the good ones, are making a mockery of the system by being weak, yes men. Who are they saying yes to? The Politicians that are enabling their bad behavior.

    All I know is, this guy didn’t get his day in court. He may have a record of violence that played into his death. What needs to happen is that the Good Cops need to start speaking out on the bad shoots. We need to back their play. Period! This mayhem between citizen and police, which has been instigated by the politicians is “No Buena!” It doesn’t end well for humanity in general, so it’s time to right our course…….

    Reply this comment
  2. Navy Jack Author 7 August, 2016, 15:02

    Just so we are all on the same page; the U.S. Constitution, including subsequent amendments, is silent regarding the use of deadly force by a police officer in the execution of a warrant or an arrest. All case law regarding the use of deadly force by a police officer in the execution of a warrant or an arrest is subject to the 4th Amendment:

    “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Fourth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution prohibits the use of deadly force to effect an arrest or prevent the escape of a suspect unless the police officer reasonably believes that the suspect committed or attempted to commit crimes involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical injury and a warning of the intent to use deadly physical force was given, whenever feasible (Tennessee v. Garner, 471 U.S. 1 (1985)).

    The Court has said that the test of reasonableness under the Fourth Amendment is not capable of “precise definition” or “mechanical application.” “[T]he reasonableness of a particular use of force must be viewed from the perspective of a reasonable officer at the scene, rather than with 20/20 vision of hindsight….” Moreover, “allowance must be made for the fact that officers are often forced to make split-second judgments in circumstances that are tense, uncertain, and rapidly evolving about the amount of force that is necessary in a particular situation.” The question is whether the officers’ actions are “objectively reasonable” in light of the facts and circumstances confronting them “(Graham v. Connor, 490 U.S. 396, 397 (1989)). With regard to vehicle chase situations, the U.S. Supreme Court has “never found the use of deadly force in connection with a dangerous car chase to violate the 4th Amendment.” (Chadrin Lee Mullenix V. Beatrice Luna, 577 U. S. (2015)).

    The law in the State of Illinois regarding police use of deadly force in an arrest or execution of a warrant is as follows:

    Sec. 7-5. Peace officer’s use of force in making arrest. (a) A peace officer, or any person whom he has summoned or directed to assist him, need not retreat or desist from efforts to make a lawful arrest because of resistance or threatened resistance to the arrest. He is justified in the use of any force which he reasonably believes to be necessary to effect the arrest and of any force which he reasonably believes to be necessary to defend himself or another from bodily harm while making the arrest. However, he is justified in using force likely to cause death or great bodily harm only when he reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or such other person, or when he reasonably believes both that:
    (1) Such force is necessary to prevent the arrest from being defeated by resistance or escape; and
    (2) The person to be arrested has committed or attempted a forcible felony which involves the infliction or threatened infliction of great bodily harm or is attempting to escape by use of a deadly weapon, or otherwise indicates that he will endanger human life or inflict great bodily harm unless arrested without delay.
    (b) A peace officer making an arrest pursuant to an invalid warrant is justified in the use of any force which he would be justified in using if the warrant were valid, unless he knows that the warrant is invalid.
    (Source: P.A. 84-1426.)

    Reply this comment
  3. lc65 8 August, 2016, 09:24

    “…Police nationwide have been on high alert since a sniper killed five officers during a Black Lives Matter protest on July 7 and another three officers were gunned down in Baton Rouge, Louisiana only 10 days later…..”
    Too bad they haven’t been on ” GOOD BEHAVIOR ” ! Apparently they are incapable. or more likely, have not been taught what good behavior is.
    The problem as I see it, is that they are just doing what they have been trained to do. Shoot first, ask questions later.
    If you are scared, SHOOT !!

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